Quigley History

quigleyQuigley Early Origins

The Irish surnames in use today are underpinned by a multitude of rich histories. The name Quigley originally appeared in Gaelic as “O Coigligh”, which may be derived from “coigeal”, which denotes “unkempt hair.”

Ancient History
The Irish race has had a significant impact on world history, which seems almost disproportionate to the size of the tiny Emerald Isle, and its population. The Irish can proudly boast of world class statesmen, artists, poets and scholars, as well as a difficult history, full of conflict and rich with Celtic culture.
Interwoven with the fabric of this great land is the history of the Irish sept Quigley. Analysts have isolated evidence by researching historical documents such as church baptismals, parish records, and ancient land grants, as well as more contemporary sources such as works by O’Hart, MacLysaght, O’Brien, and Woulfe. Research has suggested that the family name Quigley was first found in County Mayo (Irish: Maigh Eo) located on the West coast of the Republic of Ireland in the province of Connacht, where they held a family seat from very ancient times.

Spelling Variations
The Anglicization of names from Gaelic was a major cause of spelling variations of the name that were found in the archives researched. This is in addition to variations of the Gaelic itself, and spelling mistakes frequently made by church officials and clerks. Your name, Quigley, occurred in many references but variations included O’Quigley, Quigley, Cogley, Quigly, Quigg, MacQuigg, McQuigge, O’Quigg, Twigg, Fivey and Twigley, and others. Any preference for a certain spelling was often due to loyalty to a certain branch of the family or for religious or political reasons.

Early History
There is an abundance of legend about the early days Irish history, involving ancient Celtic Kings, Queens and heroes. The Celts did not commit their knowledge to writing and instead they relied on a strong oral tradition to remember and pass on events in their history. Another purpose of this oral tradition was to celebrate past warriors at feasts and celebrations, and to prepare new ones for battle with tales of glory. As a result the stories became more fantastic the more they evolved, and how strongly they are based on fact is uncertain. There are many different viewpoints on the issue though, and some historians still have faith in the old legends.
07da8448-c2ed-464e-accb-b34ae5aa997cThe last invasion of Ireland occurred about 1000 B.C. by a Celtic race from the South, likely from the area of Spain. The books by O’Hart state that these people, the Milesians, were descended from King Milesius of Spain. Milesius, a great general/king, was instrumental in defending Egypt from the King of Ethiopia. He turned his attention northward to Ireland to fulfill an ancient Druidic prophecy during a 26 year famine that he believed was his punishment for not attempting to fulfill it earlier. He sent an army to explore the fertile island. When he found that his uncle had been murdered by three resident Irish Kings of the Tuatha de Danaan, Milesius gathered another army to take revenge. He died, though, before he embarked on the trip, leaving his remaining eight sons to conquer Ireland.
They named the land Scota or Scotia, after their mother. That name was taken and applied to Caladonia, now known as Scotland, when the Scots invaded there in the 5th century. One theory about the origin of the name Ireland is that it came from ‘Ir-land,’ the land of Ir, the second son of Milesius, and one who never made it to the Island, but whose son did and was allotted a share of the land.
The great Gaelic name of Quigley emerged later in County Mayo where they held a family seat in the barony of Carra in that county and were a branch of the distinguished Ui Fiachrach, a group of Clanns in the west of Ireland, in Mayo, Sligo and Galway. They retained their territories during the first Anglo-Norman invasion of 1172 by Strongbow, but the name became dispersed after the Cromwellian 17th century invasion, and can be found in many different areas of Ireland including Galway and Louth. In the 17th century Thomas Fivey was registered in Down. Their present seat is at Kildarry in Donegal. The Gaelic root of this surname is O’Coigligh. The linguistic development of this surname is worth noting. Fivey and Twigley are anglicized from Coig in O’Coigligh, as it was thought to resemble “cuig,” the numeral five. O’Coigligh is normally anglicized Quigley, but also becomes Quigg, Twigg and Twigley. Quigg and O’Quigg were in Derry and Antrim in the 17th century and are still to be found there.

Early Notables
Notable among the family at this time was Father James O’Quigley, great Irish patriot who was hanged in England; Doctor James O’Quigley, Bishop of Buffalo.

The Great Migration
In about 1167 Dermott MacMurrough, King of Leinster, was defeated in a feud and requested aid from King Henry II of England, who opportunistically allowed him to enlist the help of his subjects. Richard de Clare, or Strongbow, became Dermott’s greatest ally. He landed in Ireland in 1170 and solidified the earlier victories of other Norman Lords with the presence of his great force. The success of the Normans in Ireland prompted the King of England to arrive with his own army in 1172, and reaffirm the allegiance of his subjects, as well as establish himself as the overlord of the other kings and chiefs in Ireland. He succeeded, and in so doing, permanently linked England to the affairs of Ireland.

Early Settlers

  • Austin Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Cane Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Cate Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Charles Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Daniel Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Terance Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Thomas Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Larance Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Margaret Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Matthew Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Owen Quigley, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745

Current Notables
In the New World the Irish played an important role in building the nation. They formed much of the labour force that built the railroads, coal mines, bridges and canals and they lent their culture to the arts, sciences, commerce and religion. Incidentally, there is a story that during the unsettled times of the 19th century, 9 rebellious Irishmen were sentenced to death. Their sentence was transferred to banishment to the colonies and in 1888, a surprised Queen Victoria learned that all nine had become prominent men in their new country, as statesmen, high court judges, mayors and bishops.

  • Hugh Quigley, Economist, and author of many publications
  • William George Henry Quigley PhD., Permanent Secretary, Department of Manpower Services, Northern Ireland
  • Ernie Quigley (1880-1960) Canadian-American sports official
  • Carroll Quigley (1910-1977) American writer and history professor at Georgetown University
  • Dennis Quigley (1913-1984) Scottish footballer
  • Edward “Eddie” Quigley (1921-1997) English footballer
  • Derek Francis Quigley QSO (b.1932) New Zealand politician
  • Jane Quigley (b.1939) American original name of Jane Alexander
  • Joan M. Quigley (b.1940) American politician from New Jersey
  • Dana Quigley (b.1947) American PGA golfer
  • Joy Quigley QSO (b.1948) New Zealand politician
  • Ken Quigley (b.1965) Canadian ACT! Consultant and proud husband & father

Symbolism

Introduction
Heraldry, in its early form, was probably introduced to Ireland by the Anglo-Normans around 1172, but by then the practice of using symbols to identify important individuals would not have been unknown to the Irish. It was not until much later that heraldry was regulated by the English Crown, and Irish symbols were then included in the armory.

Quigley1An Achievement of Arms such as the Quigley arms depicted on the left typically consists of these parts: the Escrolls, displaying the family motto and name, the family crest (if any) seen above the helmet, the actual Coat of arms (also known as ‘arms,’ or ‘the shield’), the Helmet depicted below the crest, the Torse on top of the helmet, and the Mantle draped from the helmet. Each of these elements will be described below. Supporters were a later addition to the Achievement; they are somewhat rare, and are usually personal to the grantee.

The mantle was spread over and draped from the helmet and served as a protection, ‘to repel the extremities of wet, cold, and heat, and to preserve the armour from rust.’ The numerous cuts and slits suggest that it had been torn and hacked on the field of battle. The style or design of the mantling is up to the individual heraldic artist, and it is usually depicted in the main color and metal from the shield. The helmet (or Helm) varied in shape in different ages and countries, often depicting rank. The Esquire’s Helm, as depicted here, is generally shown silver, with a closed visor and facing to the dexter (its right). On top of the helmet is a Torse or wreath which was formed by two pieces of silk twisted together. Its purpose was to hold the crest and mantle on the Helm.

Shield
Shields (or Escutcheons) at first were painted simply with one or more bands of color or ‘ordinaries’. Later, the ordinaries were used in conjunction with other figures or symbols. The Coat of Arms for the surname Quigley can be described as follows:

Quigley2QUIGLEY ARMS
A red shield with a silver orle, over all, a bend erminois.

Suggested Further Readings
“The Union of our Quigley and Munro Families” by Eleanor Freeburn. Please note: We do not have these publications in our library. They come from the catalog of Genealogical titles in the collection of the Library of Congress. Most of these Genealogies were published by their authors, probably with one small print run. You can locate these publications through the Library of Congress (http://catalog.loc.gov/webvoy.htm), or we would suggest trying to contact a library in the locale of publication (you may be able to use inter-library loan, through your local library).

Appendix – Settler List Canadian Settlers

  • Joanna Quigley, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1832
  • Kyle Quigley, aged 20, landed in Quebec in 1833
  • Thomas Quigley, aged 21, a labourer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Madawaska” in 1833
  • John Quigley, aged 23, a labourer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Madawaska” in 1833
  • Owen Quigley, aged 19, a labourer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Trial” in 1833
  • James Quigley, aged 33, a farmer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Trial” in 1833
  • Thomas Quigley, aged 24, a farmer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Isaac Quigley, aged 26, a farmer, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Mary Ann Quigley, aged 3, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Jane Quigley, aged 18 months, arrived in Saint John, NB aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Thomas Quigley, aged 24, arrived in St. John aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Isaac Quigley, aged 26, a farmer, arrived in St. John aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Mary Ann Quigley, aged 3, arrived in St. John aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Jane Quigley, aged 1, arrived in St. John aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Nancy Quigley, aged 40, a spinster, arrived in St. John aboard the ship “Protector” in 1834
  • Eleanor Quigley, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1835
  • Margaret Quigley, aged 17, arrived in Saint John aboard the ship “Susan” in 1838
  • Ann Quigley, aged 22, arrived in Saint John aboard the ship “Prudence” in 1838
  • William Quigley, aged 17, arrived in Saint John aboard the ship “Prudence” in 1838
  • Elenor Quigley, aged 6, arrived in Saint John aboard the ship “Prudence” in 1838 American Settlers
  • Austin Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Cane Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Cate Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Charles Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Daniel Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Terance Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Thomas Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Larance Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Margaret Quigley, who landed in Maryland in 1678
  • Matthew Quigley, who arrived in Maryland in 1678
  • Owen Quigley, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745
  • Edward Quigley, who landed in America in 1806
  • Martha Quigley, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1811
  • John Quigley, aged 28, landed in New York in 1812
  • T Quigley, who landed in New York, NY in 1812
  • Elizabeth Quigley, aged 21, landed in Massachusetts in 1812
  • Brian Quigley, who landed in New York, NY in 1812
  • Andrew Quigley, aged 46, arrived in New York in 1812
  • David Quigley, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816
  • Anthony Quigley, aged 20, landed in Baltimore, Maryland in 1834
  • Joseph Quigley, who arrived in New York in 1835
  • D C Quigley, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851
  • William Quigley, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1851
  • J Quigley, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1855
  • James W Quigley, who landed in Illinois in 1856-1864
  • Michael Quigley, aged 18, landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1864
  • Philip Quigley, aged 29, arrived in Mobile, Ala in 1868
  • Andrew, Charles, Daniel, Edward, Francis, George, Hugh, James, John, Michael, Patrick, Thomas, and William Quigley all arrived in Philadelphia between 1800 and 1870
  • Patrick Quigley, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1874
  • C E Quigley, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1875
  • Martin Quigley, aged 38, landed in Pennsylvania in 1877

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